PC Market To Decline in Central and Eastern Europe. What Happened in Romania? PC Market To Decline in Central and Eastern Europe. What Happened in Romania?
PC shipments in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) totaled 18.55 million units in 2014, representing a year-on-year decline of 14.0%, according to the information... PC Market To Decline in Central and Eastern Europe. What Happened in Romania?

PC shipments in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) totaled 18.55 million units in 2014, representing a year-on-year decline of 14.0%, according to the information from International Data Corporation (IDC).

The market contracted for the second year in a row, inhibited by currency fluctuations and economic slowdown in the Eastern part of the region. Portable PC shipments dropped 14.5% year on year to 11.92 million units, while desktop shipments declined 12.9% to 6.63 million units.

Russia accounted for 42.6% of total PC shipments in CEE in 2014, which means overall regional performance is heavily influenced by Russia’s results. Along with Ukraine and Kazakhstan, Russia recorded a double-digit year-on-year decline in PC shipments last year. All three markets were affected by significant devaluation of the national currencies, deterioration of macroeconomic conditions, and the political situation in Ukraine, which undermined consumer and commercial confidence.

“But everything is not that black. There were strong differences between countries in the CEE region,” says Stefania Lorenz, associate vice-president of IDC CEMA. “PC shipments in countries that belong to the Central part of CEE, recorded a year-on-year increase each quarter of 2014. This was due mainly to PC renewals on the back of low-priced Microsoft 8.1 plus Bing offers.”

This, combined with end of XP support, translated into a 16.1% year-on-year increase of portable PC shipments, with desktop shipments increasing 1.5% in the same period. PC shipments in the largest markets – Poland, the Czech Republic, and Romania– increased by 8.0%, 19.0% and 24.5% over 2013, respectively.

The top five vendors accounted for more than 70% of the CEE market in 2014. Lenovo maintained its lead, outperforming the market with year-on-year volume growth of 9.1%, due to gains in the consumer space and further expansion in the channel. An attractive product portfolio and competitive pricing also boosted Lenovo’s growth. Second-ranked HP posted a year-on-year volume decline of 8.4%. The vendor remained the leading player in the desktop PC market and among buyers in the commercial sector. Third-placed Asus and fourth-placed Acer posted volume declines of 13.9% and 23.7%, respectively. Although ranking fifth, Dell actually increased PC sales by 23.7% year on year.

“Looking ahead, IDC expects the CEE PC market to decline further, falling by 14.6% overall in 2015,” says Nikolina Jurisic, product manager for IDC CEMA. “The worsening economic outlook in the Eastern part of the region, the rise in PC prices due to the devaluation of national currencies, and a lack of low-priced 15″ MS Bing portable PCs on the market will negatively affect PC shipments.” IDC expects the overall CEE PC market to recover in 2016, in line with improving macroeconomic factors across the region.

 

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